Star Wars: The Phantom Menace (Remastered) John Williams

Album Info

Album Veröffentlichung:
2018

HRA-Veröffentlichung:
04.05.2018

Label: Lucas Film Ltd.

Genre: Soundtrack

Subgenre: Film

Das Album enthält Albumcover

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  • 1Star Wars Main Title and the Arrival at Naboo02:55
  • 2Duel of the Fates04:14
  • 3Anakin's Theme03:07
  • 4Jar Jar's Introduction and the Swim to Otoh Gunga05:05
  • 5The Sith Spacecraft and the Droid Battle02:37
  • 6The Trip to the Naboo Temple and the Audience with Boss Nass04:09
  • 7The Arrival at Tatooine and the Flag Parade04:04
  • 8He Is the Chosen One03:53
  • 9Anakin Defeats Sebulba04:22
  • 10Passage Through the Planet Core04:37
  • 11Watto's Deal and Kids at Play04:57
  • 12Panaka and the Queen's Protectors03:22
  • 13Queen Amidala and the Naboo Palace04:50
  • 14The Droid Invasion and the Appearance of Darth Maul05:11
  • 15Qui-Gon's Noble End03:46
  • 16The High Council Meeting and Qui-Gon's Funeral03:06
  • 17Augie's Great Municipal Band and End Credits09:38
  • Total Runtime01:13:53

Info zu Star Wars: The Phantom Menace (Remastered)

John Williams - Star Wars: The Phantom Menace (Remastered) (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack) 40th Anniversary-Edition: Walt Disney Records releases for the first time a 192kHz, 24bit edition of the remastered original motion picture soundtrack for Star Wars: "The Phantom Menace".

The original album was released to accompany the film (May 4, 1999). This release was certified Platinum in the U.S. and Gold in the UK, containing 17 tracks from selections of the score, meant to stand alone as a separate listening experience and not as one hears the score in the film. John Williams edited each track to present the score as one would hear it in a concert suite. Recorded in Abbey Road studios over a week, starting on February 10, 1999 performed by the London Voices and London Symphony Orchestra, Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace was the first Star Wars score Williams had composed in over 16 years. The scores of the following two films would rely heavily upon tracking from this score, a decision that Williams and George Lucas had made early into production of the film.

"Once again, John Williams has exceeded my expectations and produced a lavish, rich, moving and thrilling score. Every fan of Star Wars—and of great music—is in his debt." (George Lucas)

The Star Wars cycle, George Lucas's stellar pop parable cum merchandising blitzkrieg, has long since made history as an unparalleled cinematic-cultural-marketing phenomena; somewhere Billy Jack should be in one envious, ass-kickin' mood. Phantom Menace, easily the most eagerly anticipated film of the '90s, returns to the saga's roots and allows Lucas to flesh out the history of some of the fable's core characters and conjure up a dazzling new cast of cohorts, antagonists, and alien realms for them to interact with and in. Thus, all composer John Williams had to do was essentially reinvent the world's most popular wheel. The film-scoring legend has admirably risen to that daunting challenge, delivering an inventive score whose dynamics should surprise and delight even the most ardent SW fanatic. The Main Title and a few oh-so-sparing bars of a familiar Jedi theme are all that remains from the original trilogy's lexicon, Williams having evolved the saga's musical language, stylistic reach, and orchestral palette with masterful subtlety. The composer's most ambitious surprise is the welcome addition of strong choral elements, which he uses in ways both majestic ("Duel of the Fates") and menacing ("Passage Through the Planet's Core"). And though the film revolves around a young boy (Anakin Skywalker, who will grow to be both corrupted and redeemed as Darth Vader), the only flirtation with cloying sentimentality comes with the innocently loping "Jar Jar's Introduction." In the tradition of the Cantina and Max Rebo's Band of the previous trilogy, Williams and Lucas close out this musical installment with "Augie's Municipal Band," a Carnivale-esque romp that segues grandly into the composer's swelling title music. Williams may be the master of a grand scoring tradition, but Phantom Menace is gratifying evidence that he seldom plays it safe--even when the Force is with him.

Digitally remastered




John Williams
was born in 1932 in Long Island, New York, and later moved with his family to Los Angeles in 1948. He studied composition at UCLA. After serving in the Air Force, Williams returned to New York to study piano at the Juilliard School of Music. He worked as a jazz pianist for a time before moving back to Los Angeles to begin his career in the film studios.

Mr. Williams has composed the music for close to eighty films and has composed some of the most famous themes ever written for cinema. Some of these include Harry Potter, Jaws, Close Encounters of the Third Kind, ET - the Extraterrestrial, Jurassic Park, the Star Wars Pre-episode and Trilogy, the Indiana Jones Trilogy, Home Alone, and Empire of the Sun. Receiving 45 Academy Award nominations, Williams has been awarded with five Oscars, seven British Academy Awards, twenty-one Grammies and four Golden Globes. He also has several gold and platinum recordings. His film score for Schindler's List earned him an Oscar and a Grammy. With 45 Academy Award nominations, John Williams has the most nominations of any person alive, and is tied for second ever after Walt Disney!

Mr. Williams was named the 19th conductor of the Boston Pops Orchestra in 1980, retiring in 1993. He has appeared as guest conductor with many major orchestras, including the Dallas Symphony Orchestra, and has also written many concert pieces. His concert compositions include: Five Sacred Trees, a bassoon concerto premiered by the New York Philharmonic in 1995, a cello concerto premiered in 1994 by Yo-Yo Ma and the Boston Symphony Orchestra, and several concertos for flute, violin, clarinet, and tuba. His trumpet concerto premiered in 1996 with the Cleveland Orchestra. In addition, Mr. Williams composed the themes for the NBC News, the 1987 International Special Olympics, and the 1984, 1988, and 1996 Summer Olympic Games.

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