Gung Ho (Remastered) Patti Smith

Album info

Album-Release:
2000

HRA-Release:
02.03.2018

Label: Arista

Genre: Rock

Subgenre: Singer

Album including Album cover

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  • 1One Voice04:08
  • 2Lo and Beholden04:45
  • 3Boy Cried Wolf04:54
  • 4Persuasion04:38
  • 5Gone Pie04:06
  • 6China Bird04:08
  • 7Glitter In Their Eyes03:00
  • 8Strange Messengers08:06
  • 9Grateful04:34
  • 10Upright Come03:00
  • 11New Party04:33
  • 12Libbie's Song03:28
  • 13Gung Ho11:45
  • Total Runtime01:05:05

Info for Gung Ho (Remastered)



Patti Smith was working through grief when she returned from her eight-year recording hiatus to cut "Gone Again" (1996) and "Peace & Noice" (1997). She was dealing with the deaths of a number of close friends and family members--including husband Fred "Sonic" Smith--within a short time. Having achieved a degree of musical catharsis, Smith teamed with Pixies/Catherine Wheel producer Gil Norton for 2000's sonically gorgeous "Gung Ho".

Smith reaches beyond her punk roots, incorporating pennywhistle and mandolin into her folk-flavored song about Custer's wife ("Libbie's Song"). Longtime band member Lenny Kaye includes Middle Eastern-sounding nuances in his co-written tale of Salome ("Lo and Beholden"). Among the more stirring numbers are "Strange Messengers," written from the chilling viewpoint of a slavery victim, and "Glitter in Their Eyes," a chirpy, new wave-y anthem decrying today's rampant materialism. "Gung Ho's" 10-minute-plus title track/centerpiece lauds North Vietnamese leader Ho Chi Minh, portraying him as a patriot in love with our Constitution. "Gung Ho" will no doubt rankle a few Vietnam vets. A revitalized and inspired Smith avoids the trap of dry, didactic historical regurgitation, serving up another reminder of why she is rightly considered a downtown doyenne.

"Patti Smith's late-'90s comeback was devoted to reflective, intensely emotional music that explored her life in seclusion and the losses that forced her to reconnect with the larger world. They were acclaimed, ambitious, successful records, but they steered away from Smith's angry, activist muse, plus her penchant for visceral music. She rediscovers both on Gung Ho, her most immediate album in years. "Immediate" doesn't necessarily mean rock & roll, though. At times, she does reconnect with garage punk, notably on the Farifisa-fueled "Persuasion" and "Glitter in Their Eyes," which is graced by the guitar of Tom Verlaine, but her remarkable band -- featuring guitarists Lenny Kaye and Oliver Ray, bassist Tony Shanahan, and drummer Jay Dee Daugherty -- sounds direct and forceful even on the mid-tempo cuts that dominate the album. Smith doesn't shy away from the personal -- after all, the cover shot features her father, Grant, and the title track appears to deal with his war experiences -- but she works on a broader plane throughout the album, concentrating on larger, social messages even in the more intimate moments. The result may not be as haunting as Gone Again, but it's superficially nervier, reminiscent of a subdued, mature version of Easter. In other words, it's another handsome, shaded, and satisfying work from an artist who has reconnected with her muse." (Stephen Thomas Erlewine, AMG)

Patti Smith, vocals, guitar
Lenny Kaye, guitar
Jay Dee Daugherty, drums
Oliver Ray, guitar
Tony Shanahan, bass, keyboards

Recorded 1999 at Sear Sound, New York City
Engineered by Danton Supple
Produced by Gil Norton

Digitally remastered


Patti Smith
Part-Punk, Part-Folk, but 100% rockstar, Patti Smith has proven herself to be an enduring legend within Rock & Roll. For her work as an early pioneer of the punk movement, Patti Smith was inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame in 2007. Also an author and an activist, Patti Smith maintains a relatively low profile, but still performs and records. Patti Smith tour dates are currently scheduled nationally. Use Eventful as your Patti Smith concert calendar.

The Chicago native moved to New York City in 1967 with no money and survived through near impoverished conditions to become a rock icon. After cultivating her poetic craft on the streets of New York City and Paris, Smith began to perform rock music in 1974 and was signed by Clive Davis in 1975. She released her debut album, Horses, in 1975 and started a musical revolution. Smith was at the forefront of the punk movement and was a frequent performer at the legendary CBGB. Smith released her biggest commercial success, Easter, in 1978; the album included the massively successful single "Because of the Night", and Smith toured aggressively.

Smith remained largely out of the spotlight in the '80s, preferring to raise her kids outside of the limelight. She reemerged in the mid-90s with Peace in Noise (1997) and Gung Ho (2000), both of which earned her Grammy nominations for Best Female Rock Vocal Performance. In 2006, Smith returned to where it all began and performed a near four-hour concert at CBGB the night that the iconic club closed down. Smith has returned her attention to writing and won a National Book Award for her memoir, Just Kids, in 2010. Patti Smith is a rock legend whose music spans punk, folk, and politics.

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