Traneing In (Rudy Van Gelder Remaster) John Coltrane & Red Garland Trio

Cover Traneing In (Rudy Van Gelder Remaster)

Album info

Album-Release:
1958

HRA-Release:
16.10.2015

Label: Universal Music Classics

Genre: Jazz

Subgenre: Hard Bob

Album including Album cover Booklet (PDF)

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  • 1Traneing In12:34
  • 2Slow Dance05:28
  • 3Bass Blues07:46
  • 4You Leave Me Breathless07:24
  • 5Soft Lights And Sweet Music04:40
  • Total Runtime37:52

Info for Traneing In (Rudy Van Gelder Remaster)

With this session, recorded in the summer of 1957, John Coltrane came out from behind the harmonic safety net of a three-horn frontline to focus on his own imposing gifts as an improviser. As the only horn on 'Traneing In', the young tenor giant revels in the spotlight, demonstrating some of the hard-won lessons from his long apprenticeship with Thelonious Monk's group that very summer at New York's Five Spot club.

Red Garland basks in the cruise-control cool of the Art Taylor/Paul Chambers rhythm team on the title tune, and his jaunty opening chords serve to italicize this blues' deep, deep groove. When Coltrane enters, the rhythm section ups the ante, from Basie-esque tippling to a driving testimonial. Coltrane's dense harmonic variations unwind in nervous, compulsive layers of sound. Yet for all his complexity, a fervent preacher's cry remains at the heart of his every utterance. After a stunning Chambers solo, Garland returns with intricate Bud Powell-like variations and stately, driving block chords which incite Coltrane to further melodic delirium.

Typical of his other Prestige dates, Coltrane carefully contrasts edgy moments of tension with interludes of gentle restraint. Chambers' sultry opening chords to 'Slow Dance' give this ballad an oddly spectral cast, until Trane doubles up on the changes. 'Bass Blues' finds the limber Chambers doubling the melody with Coltrane, as Garland and Taylor intersperse witty little asides, while 'You Leave Me Breathless' is Coltrane at his most romantic, soaring on angel wings into an expressive upper register. Finally, Coltrane and Chambers roar ahead like...well, like a runaway train, on 'Soft Lights And Sweet Music,' as Taylor and Garland hold on for dear life.

„For his second long player, John Coltrane (tenor saxophone) joined forces with his Prestige labelmate Red Garland (piano) to command a quartet through a five song outing supported by a rhythm section of Paul Chambers (bass) and Art Taylor (drums). The absence of any unessential instrumentalists encourages a decidedly concerted focus from Coltrane, who plays with equal measures of confidence and freedom. The Coltrane original 'Traneing In' is a rousing blues that exemplifies the musical singularity between Coltrane and Garland. Even though the pianist takes charge from the start, the structure of the arrangement permits the tenor to construct his solo seamlessly out of Garland's while incrementally increasing in intensity, yet never losing the song's underlying swinging bop. Chambers then gets in on the action with an effervescent run that quotes the seasonal favorite 'Santa Claus Is Coming to Town.' The poignant 'Slow Dance' is a dark ballad with a simple, refined tune that is established by Coltrane. He turns things over to Chambers, and then Garland -- whose respective style and grace are virtually indescribable -- before bringing it home with one final verse. 'Bass Blues' is the second Coltrane-penned selection on the album. Right from the tricky opening riff, the slightly asymmetrical melody showcases Chambers' ability to mirror even the most intricate or seemingly improvised lines from Coltrane. The mid-tempo pace is a springboard for the tenor's spontaneous inventions as he interfaces with a rollicking and ready Garland alongside Chambers' unfettered bowing. 'You Leave Me Breathless' provides everything that a love song should with long, languid runs by Coltrane, Garland, and what is arguably Paul Chambers at his absolute finest. Few passages can match the grace and stately refinement of the bassist as he pilots the proceedings behind Taylor's steady metronome and Garland's luminous, effective comps. John Coltrane with the Red Garland Trio (1957) draws to a close on the bebop lover's dream, a fast and furious interpretation of the Irving Berlin classic 'Soft Lights and Sweet Music.' Clearly Coltrane excels within this context, laying down his note clusters more rapidly than the listener can actually absorb them. These are clear demarcations pointing toward the remarkable sonic advancements Coltrane was espousing. And although it would be a few years before he'd make the leap into full-blown free jazz, the roots can clearly be traced back here.“ (Lindsay Planer, AMG)

John Coltrane, tenor saxophone
Red Garland, piano
Paul Chambers, bass
Art Taylor, drums

Recorded August 23, 1957, Van Gelder Studio, Hackensack, New Jersey
Produced by Bob Weinstock

Digitally remastered

No biography found.

Booklet for Traneing In (Rudy Van Gelder Remaster)

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